Cognitive reserve and self-efficacy as moderators of the relationship between stress exposure and executive functioning among spousal dementia caregivers

Pertl et al. (2017) examined the relationship between psychological stress among caregivers, particularly in relation to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), and executive function. They also examined the potential for cognitive reserve and self-efficacy to act as protective factors in executive function. They found that caregivers exposed to more severe BPSD may have greater risk in terms of executive functioning and this has the potential to impact on the entire family. Contrary to their original hypothesis, the authors found that self-efficacy did not moderate the relationship between BPSD severity and psychological stress. However cognitive reserve was found to potentially protect the caregiver from the negative impact of stress on executive function. The authors acknowledge the relationships were relatively weak but argue that the area merits further research.
Title: 
Cognitive reserve and self-efficacy as moderators of the relationship between stress exposure and executive functioning among spousal dementia caregivers
Date: 
2017
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References: 
Pertl, M.M., Hannigan, C., Brennan, S., Robertson, I.H. and Lawlor, B.A., 2017. Cognitive reserve and self-efficacy as moderators of the relationship between stress exposure and executive functioning among spousal dementia caregivers. International psychogeriatrics, 29(4), pp.615-625.