Detecting prodromal Alzheimer’s disease in mild cognitive impairment: utility of the CAMGOG and other neuropsychological predictors

Gallagher et al. (2010) tested the usefulness of the Cambridge cognitive examination (CAMCOG), a well-established and widely used mini-neuropsychological battery, in detecting prodromal Alzheimer’s disease, and in particular which subtests of CAMCOG are predictive of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease. The study compared CAMCOG and its subtests with an extended version of the delayed word recall (DWR) test. They followed 182 patients with MCI over a mean duration of 26 months, during which 75 (41%) converted to Alzheimer’s disease. The study found that tests of episodic memory were most predictive of conversion to Alzheimer’s disease and the composite memory score contained within CAMCOG was superior to tests of other cognitive domains assessed in CAMCOG. While the DWR test achieved the best predictive accuracy of conversion from MCI to Alzheimer’s disease, the CAMCOG composite memory score perfomed similarly well.  

Title: 
Detecting prodromal Alzheimer’s disease in mild cognitive impairment: utility of the CAMGOG and other neuropsychological predictors
Date: 
2010
References: 

GALLAGHER, D., MHAOLAIN, A., COEN, R., WALSH, C., KILROY, D., BELINSKI, K., BRUCE, I., COAKLEY, D., WALSH, J.B., CUNNINGHAM, C. AND LAWLOR, B.A. 2010. Detecting prodromal Alzheimer’s disease in mild cognitive impairment: utility of the CAMGOG and other neuropsychological predictors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 25(12), 1280-1287.