Development and application of medication appropriateness indicators for persons with advanced dementia; A feasibility study

The aim of this study by Parsons et al. (2016) was to categorise the appropriateness of a comprehensive list of medications and medication classes for use in patients with advanced dementia. It also examined the feasibility of undertaking a longitudinal prospective cohort study to collect clinical and medication use data. Using the categories developed, it aimed to determine the appropriateness of prescribing for nursing home residents with advanced dementia in NI. The study involved a Delphi Consensus study, a longitudinal prospective cohort feasibility study and the retrospective application of appropriateness ratings to medication data of residents with advanced dementia. Consensus on appropriateness was achieved for 87 of the 97 medications and medication classes included in the survey. At baseline, the average number of medications prescribed to nursing home residents was 16.2, approximately a quarter of which were considered by the expert panel to be never appropriate. All but one of the 15 residents participating had been prescribed at least one of these medications, and this did not change significantly over the course of the study. The study demonstrates that it is feasible to collect clinical and medication use data from this cohort of people.
Title: 
Development and application of medication appropriateness indicators for persons with advanced dementia; A feasibility study
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2016
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Parsons, C., McCann, L., Passmore, P. and Hughes, C. (2015) ‘Development and Application of Medication Appropriateness Indicators for Persons with Advanced Dementia: A Feasibility Study’, Drugs and Aging, 32: 67-77.