Diagnosis and disclosure of dementia – A comparative qualitative study of Irish and Swedish General Practitioners

A cross-country study by Moore and Cahill (2013) explored the attitudes of a convenience sample of nine GPs in ROI and Sweden to dementia diagnosis and disclosure. It found that GPs largely relied on patients or their families to bring memory problems to their attention, with some GPs expressing reluctance at broaching the subject with them. GPs in both countries reported avoiding using the word ‘dementia’ in conversations with their patients. GPs in ROI were less likely than their counterparts in Sweden to have received specialist training in dementia. There was a marked difference between GPs in ROI and Sweden with regard to their satisfaction with the quantity and quality of community care services. In both countries, GPs believed that societal misunderstandings of dementia are still widespread, so much so that dementia continues to be a stigmatised condition. 

Title: 
Diagnosis and disclosure of dementia – A comparative qualitative study of Irish and Swedish General Practitioners
Date: 
2013
References: 

MOORE, V. and CAHILL, S. 2013. Diagnosis and disclosure of dementia – A comparative qualitative study of Irish and Swedish General Practitioners, Aging and Mental Health. 17(1), pp. 77-84.