Excess winter mortality associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias in the UK: a case for energy justice.

In this paper Liddell et al. (2016) analyse excess winter mortality (EWD) for all of the UK, including Northern Ireland (NI), over a 22 year period. For over 25 years excess winter deaths have been shown to be particularly related to respiratory and circulatory system failure. More recently the UK office for National Statistics reported a high level of excess winter deaths among those living with dementia with figures since winter 2009/10 indicating EWDs were twice as high as among those dying from a circulatory cause. The data suggest that these figures are not limited to those with vascular dementia. Figures in NI and Scotland show a steady increase in EWD’s, while England and Wales are more consistent. the authors suggest that the prevalence of EWDs among people with dementia indicates that prior to death they are living in levels of cold exceeding that within a normal thermal range, where their condition may mean they are less able to get warm, no longer have the same sensitivity to heat and cold and are unable to make adaptive choices to stay warm. They recommend further analysis to focus on where people are living before death and no investigation comorbid conditions at time of death.
Title: 
Excess winter mortality associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias in the UK: a case for energy justice.
Date: 
2016
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References: 
Liddell, C., Morris, C., Gray, B., Czerwinska, A. and Thomas, B., 2016. Excess winter mortality associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias in the UK: a case for energy justice. Energy Research & Social Science, 11, pp.256-262.