Exploring dementia management attitudes in primary care: a key informant survey to primary care physicians in 25 European countries

Petrazzuoli at al. (2017) report the findings from a key informant survey of primary care physicians (PCPs)in 25 European countries, including Ireland. Most physicians were found to willing and actively involved in both dementia investigation and assessment but time constraints were a major barrier. When it came to the management of dementia and particularly drug prescription, there was considerable variability between countries with Ireland being one of only five countries where primary care physicians have the right to start treatment with memantine and cholinesterase inhibitors. The authors also found variation in dementia management within countries. They conclude that attitudes to dementia work up are affected by the official rules of the country and that where PCPs are not entitled to prescribe dementia drugs, they are more likely to refer patients to secondary specialist care.
Title: 
Exploring dementia management attitudes in primary care: a key informant survey to primary care physicians in 25 European countries
Date: 
2017
Theme or key words: 
References: 
Petrazzuoli, F., Vinker, S., Koskela, T.H., Frese, T., Buono, N., Soler, J.K., Ahrensberg, J., Asenova, R., Boreu, Q.F., Peker, G.C. and Collins, C., 2017. Exploring dementia management attitudes in primary care: a key informant survey to primary care physicians in 25 European countries. International psychogeriatrics, pp.1-11.