Longitudinal costs of caring for people with Alzheimer's disease.

Data from the Enhancing Care in Alzheimer’s study (ECAD) was analysed by Gillespie et al.(2015) to estimate resource use and cost of care for a sample of people with dementia and MCI living in the community. Total informal and formal care costs rose from an average of €9,266 at baseline to €21,266 2 years later, with the increase in informal care being driven by an increase in care giver supervision hours. No significant difference was found in the cost of formal health and social care services. The authors suggest that as dependence increases, it is the families who step up to support the person. This may reflect existing resource constraints or a priority setting approach based on a reductionist philosophy; that if nothing can be done for the person, limited public resources might be better used elsewhere. The authors acknowledge the limitation of the sample size and that it did not examine data on those who had moved from the community to an institutional setting.
Title: 
Longitudinal costs of caring for people with Alzheimer's disease.
Date: 
2015
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References: 
Gillespie, P., O’Shea, E., Cullinan, J., Buchanan, J., Bobula, J., Lacey, L., Gallagher, D., Mhaolain, A.N. and Lawlor, B., 2015. Longitudinal costs of caring for people with Alzheimer's disease. International psychogeriatrics, 27(5), pp.847-856.