My Life until the End: Dying Well with Dementia

This report by the Alzheimer’s Society (UK) describes the policy landscape in England, Wales and NI relating to end of life and palliative care for people with dementia (see Living Matters, Dying Matters in the policy section of this review), summarises existing evidence, including examples of good practice and provides new evidence in the form of interviews with carers and people living with dementia. Seven key areas relating to dementia and end of life are highlighted as problematic: lack of public awareness and discussion about death and dying; provision of dignified care for people with dementia at the end of life; difficulty with communication affecting a person’s ability to articulate basic needs such as pain, discomfort, hunger and thirst; implications of the uncertain nature of dementia progression for planning palliative care including withholding and withdrawing treatment; little regard for emotional or spiritual support; differences in the quality of experience related to place of death - hospital, home, care home or hospice. The report concludes that the current health and social care system does not meet the needs of people with dementia at the end of life and makes a series of recommendations linked to the seven key areas listed above.

Title: 
My Life until the End: Dying Well with Dementia
Author: 
Date: 
2012
References: 

Lane, M. (2012) My Life until the End: Dying Well with Dementia, Alzheimer’s Society, London.