Potentially inappropriate prescribing among people with dementia in primary care: a retrospective cross-sectional study using the enhanced prescribing database.

Barry et al. (2015) applied a subset of the Screening Tool of Older Persons Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria to data from the Enhanced Prescribing Database, Northern Ireland. The aim was to estimate the extent of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) among people with dementia and to consider any association with polypharmacy, age and gender. Data on 6826 patients indicated that polypharmacy (81.5%) and PIP (64.4%) were prevalent with PIP being associated with female gender but not age. Both of these findings are much greater than those reported in previous studies. The authors suggest the finding indicate the need for medication reviews and the potential for using systems that alert physicians to high risk patients and potentially inappropriate medication combinations. While they acknowledge the difficulties of its use among this population and the limited evidence base, they suggest consideration should be given to the use of deprescribing, for example “drug holidays”.
Title: 
Potentially inappropriate prescribing among people with dementia in primary care: a retrospective cross-sectional study using the enhanced prescribing database.
Date: 
2015
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References: 
Barry, H.E., Cooper, J.A., Ryan, C., Passmore, A.P., Robinson, A.L., Molloy, G.J., Darcy, C.M., Buchanan, H. and Hughes, C.M., 2016. Potentially inappropriate prescribing among people with dementia in primary care: a retrospective cross-sectional study using the enhanced prescribing database. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 52(4), pp.1503-1513.