Preferences of older people for early diagnosis and disclosure of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) before and after considering potential risks and benefits

Robinson et al. (2014) examined the preferences of older people for early diagnosis, disclosure and screening for Alzheimer’s disease. Participants responded to one question each on diagnosis, disclosure and screening, which was followed by a brief discussion of the positive and negative factors that might be considered when deciding whether or not they would want investigation to see if they had AD or would want to be told that they have the condition. Participants were then asked to respond to the three initial questions again. The study findings support previous research suggesting that most people want to ‘know’ if they have dementia. However, the study reveals important differences in preferences for diagnosis, disclosure and screening. The main conclusion is that preferences differ depending on the question asked and preferences change when people are given the opportunity to consider the consequences. 

Title: 
Preferences of older people for early diagnosis and disclosure of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) before and after considering potential risks and benefits
Date: 
2014
References: 

ROBINSON, S., CANAVAN, M. and O’KEEFFE, S.T. 2014. Preferences of older people for early diagnosis and disclosure of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) before and after considering potential risks and benefits. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 59, pp. 607-612.