A prospective 20‐year longitudinal follow‐up of dementia in persons with Down syndrome.

This paper by McCarron et al. (2017) is based on a study following up 77 people with Down syndrome over a 20-year period. It reports that 97.4% of the group had developed dementia over the period, with a mean age of dementia diagnosis of 55 years. The study reported risk for people with Down syndrome of developing dementia as follows: 23% at age 50, 45% at age 55 and 88% by age 65 years. The study also found high levels of epilepsy among the people with Down syndrome followed and all those with epilepsy had comorbid dementia. Other common comorbidities were depression, vision impairment and hearing impairments. Despite these comorbidities, the study shows that people with Down syndrome and dementia are living longer. The authors argue for the reorganisation of health and social care services, to be better equipped to care for this group of people.
Title: 
A prospective 20‐year longitudinal follow‐up of dementia in persons with Down syndrome.
Date: 
2017
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References: 
McCarron, M., McCallion, P., Reilly, E., Dunne, P., Carroll, R. and Mulryan, N., 2017. A prospective 20‐year longitudinal follow‐up of dementia in persons with Down syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 61(9), pp.843-852.