Self-efficacy for managing dementia may protect against burden and depression in Alzheimer's caregivers

In a study of eighty-four patient/caregiver dyads with mainly mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, Gallagher et al. (2011c) examined the relationship between self-efficacy for dementia management and symptoms of burden and depression among caregivers.  They found that self-efficacy for symptom management of those with mild to moderate dementia directly impacts on the psychological health of caregivers, while among those with moderate to severe dementia, self-efficacy was more likely to mediate the relationship between the two.  They also found that self-efficacy may act as a buffer against the impact of behavioural symptoms on caregiver depression and burden.

Dependence and caregiver burden in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment (2011a)

Determinants of the desire to institutionalize in Alzheimer's caregivers(2011b)

Title: 
Self-efficacy for managing dementia may protect against burden and depression in Alzheimer's caregivers
Date: 
2011
Journal Area: 
References: 

GALLAGHER, D., NI MHAOLAIN, A., CROSBY, L., RYAN, D., LACEY, L., COEN, R., F., WALSH, C., COAKLEY, D., WALSH, J., B., CUNNINGHAM, C. and LAWLOR, B., A., 2011c. Self-efficacy for managing dementia may protect against burden and depression in Alzheimer's caregivers. Aging & Mental Health, 15(6), pp. 663-670.