A systematic review of electronic assistive technology within supporting living environments for people with dementia

This is a systematic review conducted by Daly Lynn et al. (2017) which aimed to provide an overview of assistive technologies in use in residential care settings to support people with dementia. It also set out to provide an overview of the methodologies adopted to assess the impact of such technologies and the extent to which people with dementia were included in studies exploring these technologies. The paper outlines the search strategy, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the studies selected. A total of 61 studies were included in the review, 23 of which focused on telecare technology interventions in long-term care settings, with a wide range of methodological approaches adopted in the studies. Studies on light therapy, robotic companions, technological solutions to support well-being and leisure, simulated presence therapy, and those relating to orientation and activities of daily living were included in the review. The challenges raised by the technologies are discussed including the varieties of technologies from which to choose as are issues of informed consent.
Title: 
A systematic review of electronic assistive technology within supporting living environments for people with dementia
Date: 
2017
Theme or key words: 
References: 
Daly Lynn, J., Rondón-Sulbarán, J., Quinn, E., Ryan, A., McCormack, B., and Martinet, S. (2017) ‘A systematic review of electronic assistive technology within supporting living environments for people with dementia’ Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice.