A systematic review of the public’s knowledge and understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

In this review Cahill et al. (2015) evaluated existing literature on the general publics’ knowledge of dementia. Forty studies from 15 countries, including Northern Ireland met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies (90%) took a quantitative approach and the authors highlight the need for more qualitative research. Almost half of the studies indicated poor levels of knowledge about dementia with the most common misconception being that dementia is a normal part of ageing. A further misconception was that individuals have no control over whether or not they develop dementia. The authors point out the difficulty in drawing conclusions from the data because of the wide range of approaches across the studies, conceptually and in areas such as sampling, inclusion and exclusion criteria. However they do conclude there is a need for more research in lower and middle income countries where most people with dementia live.
Title: 
A systematic review of the public’s knowledge and understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.
Date: 
2015
Theme or key words: 
References: 
Cahill, S., Pierce, M., Werner, P., Darley, A. and Bobersky, A., 2015. A systematic review of the public’s knowledge and understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 29(3), pp.255-275.