The under-detection of cognitive impairment in Nursing Homes in the Dublin Area: The need for on-going cognitive assessment.

While it is known that the majority of people residing in long-stay care settings are likely to have dementia, it is not known how many actually receive a formal diagnosis of dementia. Cahill et al. (2010) sought to address this gap, and at the same time test a methodology for detecting dementia among residents in long-stay care settings. A sample of 100 residents drawn from across four different nursing homes in Dublin was screened for cognitive impairment using MMSE and MoCA. One-third of the sample (32) had already received a diagnosis of dementia. However, a large proportion was first identified during the screening as having either a mild, moderate or severe cognitive impairment. Given that some of these residents are likely to have dementia, the study points to the under-detection of dementia in long-stay care settings in ROI and highlights the need for on-going assessment. 

Title: 
The under-detection of cognitive impairment in Nursing Homes in the Dublin Area: The need for on-going cognitive assessment.
Journal: 
Date: 
2010
References: 

CAHILL, S., DIAZ-PONCE, A., COEN, R.F. and WALSH, C. 2010. The under-detection of cognitive impairment in Nursing Homes in the Dublin Area: The need for on-going cognitive assessment. Age and Ageing, 38(1), 128-130.