Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology Used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia

In this paper, Mulvenna et al. (2017) examine the ethics of using assistive technology such as video surveillance in the homes of people with dementia. The paper sets out the background context to the study and reviews related studies that have been carried out in relation to this topic. The paper then describes what a video surveillance solution might look like. Using a living lab approach, the study engaged with 2 people with dementia and 22 family caregivers to elicit their views on the use of video surveillance and if these were consistent with the findings reported in the literature. The majority thought that video surveillance was a good or very good idea and the system easy or very easy to use. Ethical principles were evident in the responses of participants, with autonomy presented most frequently, as were some cautious perspectives. The paper concludes that the use of cameras in the home of a person living with dementia where family caregivers could monitor their relative with dementia was supported as useful, ethical and moral providing the right protocol is in place to gain consent, but that some ethical discomfort arises when professional caregivers are involved in caring within the home.
Title: 
Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology Used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia
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Date: 
2017
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References: 
Mulvenna, M., Hutton, A., Coates, V., Martin, S., Todd, S., Bond, R. and Moorhead, A., 2017. Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology Used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia. Neuroethics, pp.1-12.