Alzheimer’s Society

Report on Creating Dementia Friendly Communities

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

There are currently seven communities across ROI designated as Dementia Friendly Communities under a Dementia Friendly Communities Initiative of the Alzheimer Society of Ireland.

The idea of creating dementia friendly communities was the subject of a 2012 report by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland. The report was based on work that the ASI undertook with a UK-based organisation Innovations in Dementia to gain a better understanding of the concept. The report briefly outlines the concept of dementia friendly communities and what it means to people with dementia. It reports on the issues arising from workshops that the Alzheimer Society of Ireland held with its staff and volunteers, outlines some of the initiatives aimed at making communities dementia friendly led by Alzheimer Society of Ireland staff and makes four recommendations for creating dementia friendly communities.      

Building Consensus for the Future: Report on the Feasibility Study on Palliative Care for People with Dementia

Alzheimer’s Society, Irish Hospice Foundation
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

This report documents a joint partnership project in ROI between the Irish Hospice Foundation and The Alzheimer Society of Ireland that aimed to build consensus on palliative dementia care.

The report is set in the context of international and national policy, reviews examples of best practice, societal and service challenges and incorporates the perspectives of family members and health care professionals. A series of recommendations are presented thematically: services; education and training; research; policy and advocacy.

Unlocking Diagnosis: The Key to Improving the Lives of People with Dementia

Alzheimer’s Society
All Party Parliamentary Group
2012

This inquiry by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia covers all parts of the UK, including NI. Evidence for the inquiry was gathered from people with dementia, carers, family members, health professionals and other organisations and interested others, using a questionnaire.

The inquiry found a range of barriers to diagnosis that included poor public awareness; a need for GP training and problems with the Quality and Outcomes framework within which GPs operate; problems with current assessment tools; variability in memory services provision; and poor post-diagnostic support. Nine general recommendations are made with further specific suggestions for devolved health administrations. In the case of NI it was suggested that the awareness campaign referred to in the regional strategy could be prioritised; that the Health Minister could make a commitment on how data on diagnostic rates already available through the NHS Atlas of Variation could be used in monitoring the progress of the strategy; the Health and Social Care Board and the Public Health Agency could explore options to include questions to identify symptoms of dementia through regular interventions with the over-65s and others at higher risk of dementia.

The Dementia Tax

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer’s Society (UK)
2011

This report was produced by the Alzheimer’s Society (UK) to inform the debate on the funding of care and support for people with dementia.

The report, which follows the Society’s first Dementia Tax report (2008), suggests that people with dementia face the highest costs of care of any group and have to pay the most towards their care to the extent that the authors consider this a ‘Dementia Tax.’ Almost 4,000 people either living with dementia (411) or caring for someone with dementia were surveyed (1% of this population resided in NI). The report primarily focuses on England but has influenced policy development in Wales and NI. Key indicators of a better funding and charging system of care are suggested: people with dementia living at home for longer with better social contact; less people going into hospital and shorter hospital stays; more choice in relation to care at home and in formal care environments; the provision of specialist dementia care in care homes. The report also calls on the government to ensure an open public debate is held on the Dilnot Report (2011), with greater clarity and scrutiny of this report, recognition of the contribution of families to providing care, changes to care regulation, and creating better systems to reward and retain care staff. 

Living With Dementia’: Implications for the National Dementia Strategy: Summary of Roundtable Discussions Submitted to the National Dementia Strategy Working Group

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2013

The fourth Alzheimer Society of Ireland publication reports on two roundtable discussions organised by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland, which provided an opportunity for the National Dementia Strategy Working Group and Department of Health officials to meet with people with dementia and carers a

nd get their input on priority areas earmarked for inclusion in the strategy. The roundtables were structured around three themes: the role of the GP; community services; and dementia awareness and education. The report summarises the discussions points and key messages under each heading. 

Multidisciplinary Clinicians Roundtable on the National Dementia Strategy

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2013

The third Alzheimer Society of Ireland publication is a report summarising a roundtable discussion involving healthcare professionals from multidisciplinary backgrounds including occupational therapy, social work, physiotherapy, speech and language therapy and nursing.

The themes used to structure the roundtable discussion were grounded in each of the five disciplinary areas: non-pharmacological interventions and behaviours that challenge (occupational therapy); improving Communication (speech and language therapy); physical activity for health and wellbeing (physiotherapy); A Social Work Perspective (social work); and the registered nurse’s contribution to person centred care (nursing).  As with the previous roundtable discussion, the report concludes with a set of suggestions as to how multidisciplinary clinicians can influence the development of the Irish National Dementia Strategy.  

Clinicians’ Roundtable on the National Dementia Strategy ReportClinicians’ Roundtable on the National Dementia Strategy Report

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2013

The second Alzheimer Society of Ireland publication is a report summarising a roundtable discussion involving health care professionals from the four areas of Old Age Psychiatry, Geriatric Medicine, Neurology and Psychology.

Facilitated by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland, the roundtable discussion brought together participants to share their expertise and discuss core clinical elements of the upcoming Irish National Dementia Strategy. The discussion centred on three key themes: Clinical Leadership and Developing a Dementia Register; People with Younger Onset Dementia; and Early Diagnosis and Memory Clinics/Services. A set of further actions needed to move the issues discussed forward is also included. 

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