COEN, R.F.

Determinants of the desire to institutionalize in Alzheimer's caregivers

GALLAGHER, D., NI MHAOLAIN, A., CROSBY, L., RYAN, D., LACEY, L., COEN, R.F., WALSH, C., COAKLEY, D., WALSH, J.B., CUNNINGHAM, C., LAWLOR, B.A.
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
2011

In a second paper from the same study Gallagher et al. (2011b) explored determinants of the desire to institutionalise (DI) among those caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease.

 They asked whether potentially modifiable caregivers attributes were linked to DI and found that the most significant of these were caregiver burden and depression.  They also found an association between low caregiver self-efficacy and DI, and that caregivers with an emotion focused coping style were less likely to report DI.  The authors conclude that a multifactoral approach should be taken to reduce symptoms of burden and depression among caregivers. 

Dependence and caregiver burden in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment (2011a)

Self-efficacy for managing dementia may protect against burden and depression in Alzheimer's caregivers(2011c)

Dependence and caregiver burden in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment

GALLAGHER, D., NI MHAOLAIN, A., CROSBY, L., RYAN, D., LACEY, L., COEN, R.F., WALSH, C., COAKLEY, D., WALSH, J.B., CUNNINGHAM, C., LAWLOR, B.A.
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
2011

One hundred participants with mostly mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers took part in this study by Gallagher et al (2011a), the objectives of which were to determine the impact of patient dependence on caregiver burden and to determine its value as a predictor of care

giver burden. The authors report functional decline and patient dependence as most predictive of caregiver burden in the earlier stages of dementia while neuropsychiatric or behavioural symptoms were most predictive as dementia progressed.  The authors also comment on the usefulness and easy administration of the dependence scale.

Determinants of the desire to institutionalize in Alzheimer's caregivers(2011b)

Self-efficacy for managing dementia may protect against burden and depression in Alzheimer's caregivers(2011c)

Everyday episodic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a preliminary investigation

IRISH, M., LAWLOR, B.A., COEN, R.F., O’MARA, S.M.
BMC Neuroscience
2011

In their study, Irish et al.

(2011) aimed to characterise the nature of the memory impairment in MCI (using experimental tasks probing multiple domains of episodic memory function, including associative, spatial and everyday memory tasks that are analogues of real-world scenarios and are commonly encountered by individuals in their daily lives) and to obtain preliminary data regarding which of these tasks, if any, could potentially serve as an aid to identifying individuals with MCI in the prodromal stages of AD. Longitudinal follow-up data suggested that delayed associative memory performance at baseline may have some predictive utility for subsequent conversion to probable AD. This suggests that a simple Face-Name pairs test may have the potential to be a useful neuropsychological task for identifying individuals in the prodromal stage of AD. 

The under-detection of cognitive impairment in Nursing Homes in the Dublin Area: The need for on-going cognitive assessment.

CAHILL, S., DIAZ-PONCE, A., COEN, R.F., WALSH, C.
Age and Ageing
2010

While it is known that the majority of people residing in long-stay care settings are likely to have dementia, it is not known how many actually receive a formal diagnosis of dementia. Cahill et al.

(2010) sought to address this gap, and at the same time test a methodology for detecting dementia among residents in long-stay care settings. A sample of 100 residents drawn from across four different nursing homes in Dublin was screened for cognitive impairment using MMSE and MoCA. One-third of the sample (32) had already received a diagnosis of dementia. However, a large proportion was first identified during the screening as having either a mild, moderate or severe cognitive impairment. Given that some of these residents are likely to have dementia, the study points to the under-detection of dementia in long-stay care settings in ROI and highlights the need for on-going assessment. 

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