MURPHY, K.

Using focus groups to interview persons with moderate and severe dementia

CASEY, D., MURPHY, K.
Current Nursing Journal
2014

Casey and Murphy (2014) reviews the use of focus groups in conducting research and people with dementia and describes how focus groups were used with a purposive sample of people with moderate and severe dementia attending a respite centre to explore the attributes that they valu

ed most in professional carers.  Following the CORTE interviewing guide, they found that people with moderate and severe dementia participated and engaged well in the focus groups and stimulated each other’s engagement. They appeared to enjoy the focus groups and were able to offer invaluable information on what they most valued in professional carers - kindness, gentleness, humour, and carers willing to meaningful engage with their preferred activities. The authors conclude that focus groups have potential for use in collecting data from people with moderate and severe dementia.       

Challenges that specialist palliative care nurses encounter when caring for patients with advanced dementia

BARBER, J., MURPHY, K.
International journal of palliative nursing
2011

In a literature review examining specialist palliative care for people with dementia Barber and Murphy (2011) reported that there is very little information available about end-of-life care in advanced dementia from the viewpoint of the SPC nurse.

The review suggests that expertise in both dementia care and palliative care needs to be combined and that further research is required to establish guidelines to assist with specialist training of staff.

Assessment of factors that influence physician decision making regarding medication use in patients with dementia at the end of life

PARSONS, C., MCCORRY, N., MURPHY, K., BYRNE, S., O'SULLIVAN, D., O'MAHONY, D., PASSMORE, P., PATTERSON, S., HUGHES, C.
International journal of geriatric psychiatry
2014

Parsons et al.

(2014) assessed the extent to which patient-related factors and physician's country of practice influenced decision making among hospital physicians and GPs regarding withholding or discontinuing key medications in patients with end-stage dementia in NI and in ROI. The study evidences uncertainty and variation around the prescribing of antibiotics and the discontinuation of anti-dementia medication. There was less variability in decision-making related to statins and anti-psychotic drugs. The authors found that for all medications, care setting and physician's country of practice had the strongest and most consistent effects on decision making. 

Developing a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff in long-stay care facilities in Ireland

COONEY, A., O'SHEA, E., CASEY, D., MURPHY, K., DEMPSEY, L., SMYTH, S., HUNTER, A., MURPHY, E., DEVANE, D., JORDAN, F.
Journal of Clinical Nursing
2013

Cooney et al. (2013) describe the development and piloting of a structured education reminiscence programme for staff in long stay care settings.

 The programme was structured around a four-phase model: problem definition, accumulation of building blocks for intervention design, intervention design and validation.  The authors acknowledge that taking such a comprehensive approach is time consuming and labour intensive but argue that the nature of the programme gave staff ownership and enabled them to effectively use reminiscence in daily practice, improving their knowledge and ability to meet the psychosocial needs of residents.

The impact of reminiscence on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay care

O'SHEA, E., DEVANE, D., COONEY, A., CASEY, D., JORDAN, F., HUNTER, A., MURPHY, E., NEWELL, J., CONNOLLY, S., MURPHY, K.
International journal of geriatric psychiatry
2014

In the context of increasing recognition of the potential value of reminiscence in maintaining or improving quality of life, O’Shea et al.

(2014) evaluated the effectiveness of a structured education-based reminiscence programme for people with dementia in long stay residential care settings in ROI. Effectiveness was measured in a two-group, single-blind clustered randomised trial, using self-rated quality of life as the primary outcome. The results on the effects of the intervention suggest that there was a positive but clinically non-significant improvement in the mean quality of life of the residents in the intervention group compared with the control group. However, the results of per-protocol analysis, which includes only units that followed protocol, indicates that there was a clinically and statistically significant effect of the intervention on quality of life of residents with those in the intervention groups experiencing a better improvement in quality of life compared to those in the control group.  

‘Seeing me through my memories': a grounded theory study on using reminiscence with people with dementia living in long-term care

COONEY, A., HUNTER, A., MURPHY, K., CASEY, D., DEVANE, D., SMYTH, S., DEMPSEY, L., MURPHY, E., JORDAN, F., O'SHEA, E.
Journal of Clinical Nursing
2014

Cooney et al. (2014) examined the perceptions of reminiscence and its impact among relatives, staff and people with dementia participating in the study.

Staff felt that reminiscence allowed them to “see and know” the person behind the dementia and felt that it also allowed the person with dementia to view them as individuals, while residents perceived staff to be more interested in them as individuals.  The authors suggest this ‘revealing’ is not necessarily a result of the reminiscence but rather due to the resulting interaction and the shared bond that is created.  Family members welcomed staff getting to know their relative as an individual and the study also found that positive effects impacted on the wider group of residents.  Lack of time was the most significant barrier.

Reminiscence in dementia: A concept analysis

DEMPSEY, L., MURPHY, K., COONEY, A., CASEY, D., O'SHEA, E., DEVANE, D., JORDAN, F., HUNTER, A.
Dementia
2014

Dempsey et al. (2014) analyse the concept of reminiscence in dementia.  They identify a range of definitions and the use of surrogate terms, and that reminiscence is a process that takes place in stages in the context of interaction with others.

 They conclude that reminiscence is an effective psychosocial intervention and that developing the concept further would benefit from an operational definition.

Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

O'SHEA, E., DEVANE, D., MURPHY, K., COONEY, A., CASEY, D., JORDAN, F., HUNTER, A., MURPHY, E.
Trials
2011

O’Shea et al. (2011) outline the study protocol for the trial referred to above. This study aimed to address the scarcity of trials on reminiscence as an intervention for people with dementia and the methodological issues associated with existing evidence.

 The protocol outlines a two-group, single blind cluster randomised trial conducted in long stay care settings.  The primary outcome is quality of life for residents, with secondary outcomes of agitation levels and depression in residents, and staff care burden. 

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