‘Seeing me through my memories': a grounded theory study on using reminiscence with people with dementia living in long-term care

Cooney et al. (2014) examined the perceptions of reminiscence and its impact among relatives, staff and people with dementia participating in the study. Staff felt that reminiscence allowed them to “see and know” the person behind the dementia and felt that it also allowed the person with dementia to view them as individuals, while residents perceived staff to be more interested in them as individuals.  The authors suggest this ‘revealing’ is not necessarily a result of the reminiscence but rather due to the resulting interaction and the shared bond that is created.  Family members welcomed staff getting to know their relative as an individual and the study also found that positive effects impacted on the wider group of residents.  Lack of time was the most significant barrier.

Title: 
‘Seeing me through my memories': a grounded theory study on using reminiscence with people with dementia living in long-term care
Date: 
2014
References: 

COONEY, A., HUNTER, A., MURPHY, K., CASEY, D., DEVANE, D., SMYTH, S., DEMPSEY, L., MURPHY, E., JORDAN, F. and O'SHEA, E., 2014. 'Seeing me through my memories': a grounded theory study on using reminiscence with people with dementia living in long-term care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(23), pp. 3564-3574.