Correlates of frailty In Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Ni Mhaolain et al. (2011) examine the relationship between frailty and a range of domains including age, comorbidity, course of illness, cognitive impairment, functional limitations and abnormalities of behaviour in a group of patients with AD and MCI. The study found that 51% of the patients were robust or not-frail, with 49% at an intermediate or complete stage of frailty.  It suggests that escalating frailty is positively associated with increasing number of medical comorbidities and advancing age rather than being a marker of cognitive decline and severity of illness. The study suggests that optimising the management of co-morbid illness in people with dementia may play a role in minimizing the health impact of frailty in this group. 

Title: 
Correlates of frailty In Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment
Date: 
2011
References: 

NI MHAOLAIN, A., GALLAGHER, D., CROSBY, L., RYAN, D., LACEY, L., COEN, R., BRUCE, I., WALSH, J.B., CUNNINGHAM, C., LAWLOR, B.A., et al. 2011. Correlates of frailty In Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Age and Ageing, 40(5), pp. 630-633.