Professional carers’ experiences of caring for individuals with intellectual disability and dementia: A review of the literature.

This article documents a narrative literature review of professional carer’s experiences of caring for individuals with intellectual disability and dementia, between January 2010 and May 2015. The literature suggests a lack of knowledge among staff about dementia progression, the presence of pain and the impact of the environment, with staff aware of the need for training. Cleary and O’Doody (2017) report evidence of an increased demand in care giving and on levels of stress among staff. Early signs of dementia are sometime misinterpreted as being part of the intellectual disability and dementia may only be recognised when more overt behavioural and psychological symptoms present. The authors highlight evidence of the need for training that is specific to intellectual disability, person centred and role appropriate and to the need for staff to be recognised as a key resource.
Title: 
Professional carers’ experiences of caring for individuals with intellectual disability and dementia: A review of the literature.
Date: 
2017
Theme or key words: 
References: 
Cleary, J. and Doody, O., 2017. Professional carers’ experiences of caring for individuals with intellectual disability and dementia: A review of the literature. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 21(1), pp.68-86.