Psychosocial intervention use in long-stay dementia care: A classic grounded theory.

Hunter et al. (2016) set out to develop a grounded theory of staff use of psychosocial interventions with people with dementia in long stay care. The theory explains staff motivation to use psycho social interventions, and the interaction between institutional and personal factors. The core category to emerge was “becoming a person again”. Key to this is the understanding of psychosocial intervention as a mutual experience for staff and residents with dementia. Four conceptual stages are theorised around this category; balancing the influences; individualising status, striving to make the most of time; interpreting care. The authors suggest the theory offers new knowledge on how the use of a psychosocial intervention arises from a balancing of needs of residents with dementia and staff and that this model can support psychosocial intervention training and embedding in practice.
Title: 
Psychosocial intervention use in long-stay dementia care: A classic grounded theory.
Date: 
2016
Theme or key words: 
References: 
Hunter, A., Keady, J., Casey, D., Grealish, A. and Murphy, K., 2016. Psychosocial intervention use in long-stay dementia care: A classic grounded theory. Qualitative health research, 26(14), pp.2024-2034.