Alzheimer Society of Ireland

Alzheimer Society of Ireland Database of Service Utilisation

Alzheimer Society of Ireland

Provides (for management purposes) monthly information on utilisation of ASI dementia specific home care (including in-home respite care and residential respite care services) by people with dementia disaggregated by geographical area. 

Continuing to Care for People with Dementia: Irish Family Carers’ Experience of their Relatives Transition to a Nursing Home

Argyle, E., Downes, M, Tasker, J.
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2011

The majority of people with dementia live in their own homes and family carers provide the main bulk of care for them. However, a time often comes when a person with dementia has to move into a long-stay care setting.

But what are the experiences of family carers in ROI when a relative with dementia moves into a long-stay care setting? This is the primary focus of this research by Argyle, Downes and Tasker (2011). It found a range of factors accumulated and contributed to the decision to pursue long-stay care, with health professionals often being the one to initiate discussions around this.  Family carers experienced conflicting emotions, from relief through to more painful emotions of guilt, grief and loneliness, with varying intensities. How well they adjusted to their relatives’ admission to long-stay care was influenced by the perceived quality of the long-stay care setting, their familiarity with it and receipt of emotional and spiritual support. Following transition, the carers’ role was characterised by both continuity and change. The research indicated that all carers wanted to continue to participate in the long term care of their relative and reported that good lines of communication with staff, having information and education about dementia and dementia care and having ongoing emotional support were essential. 

Report on Creating Dementia Friendly Communities

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

There are currently seven communities across ROI designated as Dementia Friendly Communities under a Dementia Friendly Communities Initiative of the Alzheimer Society of Ireland.

The idea of creating dementia friendly communities was the subject of a 2012 report by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland. The report was based on work that the ASI undertook with a UK-based organisation Innovations in Dementia to gain a better understanding of the concept. The report briefly outlines the concept of dementia friendly communities and what it means to people with dementia. It reports on the issues arising from workshops that the Alzheimer Society of Ireland held with its staff and volunteers, outlines some of the initiatives aimed at making communities dementia friendly led by Alzheimer Society of Ireland staff and makes four recommendations for creating dementia friendly communities.      

Opening Conversations: Developing a Model for the Alzheimer Society of Ireland of best practice palliative care interventions for people with dementia and their families

MacConville, U.
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2011

This was a small-scale qualitative research project based in ROI that aimed to develop a model of best-practice palliative care interventions for people with dementia, integrating palliative care interventions into Alzheimer Society of Ireland service planning.

 Two key areas are the focus of the model: the transition from Alzheimer Society of Ireland services to long term care and end of life care.  The report produced by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland makes fourteen recommendations addressing: raising awareness; removing barriers to a clear diagnosis; providing a continuity of care; active management of the transition of care; addressing end-of-life care needs; and supporting family members and carers.

Building Consensus for the Future: Report on the Feasibility Study on Palliative Care for People with Dementia

Alzheimer’s Society, Irish Hospice Foundation
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

This report documents a joint partnership project in ROI between the Irish Hospice Foundation and The Alzheimer Society of Ireland that aimed to build consensus on palliative dementia care.

The report is set in the context of international and national policy, reviews examples of best practice, societal and service challenges and incorporates the perspectives of family members and health care professionals. A series of recommendations are presented thematically: services; education and training; research; policy and advocacy.

Integrated Care Pathways for People with Dementia: Exploring the Potential for Ireland and the forthcoming National Dementia Strategy

Irving, K., McGarrigle, L.
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

In this expert policy paper by Irving and McGarrigle (2012) and a book chapter bearing the same title (Irving et al., 2013), Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) are defined as instruments designed to map out the direction of clinical and administrative activities for all care professionals working wi

th people who have a specific disease such as dementia. They scope out what Integrated Care Pathways are and consider the practical application of Integrated Care Pathways. They summarise the evidence pointing to the benefits of Integrated Care Pathways and outline the challenges that need to be addressed if Integrated Care Pathways are to be successful. They compare and contrast two cases studies, one from England and one from the Scotland, before looking at the relevance of Integrated Care Pathways for ROI, following which they highlight key issues relating to the health care system and the role of case management that need to be addressed if Integrated Care Pathways are to be successfully introduced in ROI. Cahill (2013), writing about dementia and integrated care, argues that although integrated care services is widely promoted in public policy in ROI, the evidence suggests that integrated care for people with dementia is more of an aspiration than a reality. She identifies several changes that are needed in service provision for integrated care to become a reality for people with dementia.    

An Economic Perspective of Dementia Care in Ireland: Maximising Benefits and Maintaining Cost Efficiency

TRÉPEL, D.
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2010

Trepel (2010) examines the international evidence on dementia in relation to prevention, care and cure and considers how the evidence can be used to inform decisions about spending on dementia that will maximise benefits to society and at the same time maximise optimal cost efficiency, and in par

ticular the implications for ROI. He concludes that investing in services and interventions to support carers is essential to achieving cost-effectiveness in dementia care. 

Financing Dementia: What money is available, what does dementia need and will the required resources be received?

TRÉPEL, D.
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2012

In a later report, Trepel (2012) examines the different ways in which healthcare systems can be financed and resources distributed to those in need of healthcare.

He describes the unique public-private mix of financing health care in ROI, the two-tiered system of healthcare that has evolved, and the implications that this has for dementia care in ROI. Trepel (2010) highlights the absence of a clear budget line for dementia care. With increasing age dependency ratios meaning that fewer resources will be available in the future, he argues that the Irish government needs to make a financial commitment to dementia, guided by the principles of social solidarity, social sustainability and interdependency. To meet the needs of people with dementia and their carers and promote their quality of life, he argues that the “social contract” paid for during the productive years needs to be demonstrably upheld and contractual responsibility of private health insurers recognised.   

Living With Dementia’: Implications for the National Dementia Strategy: Summary of Roundtable Discussions Submitted to the National Dementia Strategy Working Group

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2013

The fourth Alzheimer Society of Ireland publication reports on two roundtable discussions organised by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland, which provided an opportunity for the National Dementia Strategy Working Group and Department of Health officials to meet with people with dementia and carers a

nd get their input on priority areas earmarked for inclusion in the strategy. The roundtables were structured around three themes: the role of the GP; community services; and dementia awareness and education. The report summarises the discussions points and key messages under each heading. 

Multidisciplinary Clinicians Roundtable on the National Dementia Strategy

Alzheimer’s Society
Alzheimer Society of Ireland
2013

The third Alzheimer Society of Ireland publication is a report summarising a roundtable discussion involving healthcare professionals from multidisciplinary backgrounds including occupational therapy, social work, physiotherapy, speech and language therapy and nursing.

The themes used to structure the roundtable discussion were grounded in each of the five disciplinary areas: non-pharmacological interventions and behaviours that challenge (occupational therapy); improving Communication (speech and language therapy); physical activity for health and wellbeing (physiotherapy); A Social Work Perspective (social work); and the registered nurse’s contribution to person centred care (nursing).  As with the previous roundtable discussion, the report concludes with a set of suggestions as to how multidisciplinary clinicians can influence the development of the Irish National Dementia Strategy.  

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